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The Total Benefits Cap: Implementation

The total benefits cap is a cap on all benefits receivable by a household of £500 a week for couples and single parent households and £350 a week for single people. There are exclusions for some household types including war widows and those receiving working tax credits. It is estimated that 67,000 claimants will be affected and that they will lose an average of £83 a week. The estimated savings are £305million by 2014/15 although a budget of £130million has been made available for discretionary payments. The measure came into effect in April 2013. The government considers that as well as making savings the reform will bring fairness to the benefits system as workless households will not be able to receive more in benefits than the average working household receives in wages & salaries.

This briefing paper looks in detail at the implementation of the total benefits cap and includes sections on:

  • Introduction to the total benefits cap
  • The results of the pilots
  • Final roll out
  • Benefit cap task force set up in Barnet

Your free copy can be downloaded from HERE

The total benefits cap is a cap on all benefits receivable by a household of £500 a week for couples and single parent households and £350 a week for single people. There are exclusions for some household types including war widows and those receiving working tax credits. It is estimated that 67,000 claimants will be affected and that they will lose an average of £83 a week. The estimated savings are £305million by 2014/15 although a budget of £130million has been made available for discretionary payments. The measure came into effect in April 2013. The government considers that as well as making savings the reform will bring fairness to the benefits system as workless households will not be able to receive more in benefits than the average working household receives in wages & salaries.

This briefing paper looks in detail at the implementation of the total benefits cap and includes sections on:

  • Introduction to the total benefits cap
  • The results of the pilots
  • Final roll out
  • Benefit cap task force set up in Barnet

Your free copy can be downloaded from HERE

The total benefits cap is a cap on all benefits receivable by a household of £500 a week for couples and single parent households and £350 a week for single people. There are exclusions for some household types including war widows and those receiving working tax credits. It is estimated that 67,000 claimants will be affected and that they will lose an average of £83 a week. The estimated savings are £305million by 2014/15 although a budget of £130million has been made available for discretionary payments. The measure came into effect in April 2013. The government considers that as well as making savings the reform will bring fairness to the benefits system as workless households will not be able to receive more in benefits than the average working household receives in wages & salaries.

This briefing paper looks in detail at the implementation of the total benefits cap and includes sections on:

  • Introduction to the total benefits cap
  • The results of the pilots
  • Final roll out
  • Benefit cap task force set up in Barnet

Your free copy can be downloaded from HERE

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